Lost People in Church Leadership

by

John Gillmartin

[In response to the April editorial. seeking suggestions on how to maintain harmony in the church-letter abridged to meet length requirements]:

Each denomination and church has its own unique obstacles to harmony; but as long as churches in any denomination conduct business as so many do today, harmony will remain illusive.

As long as leaders are selected, not because they are spiritually gifted and called but because they are a "warm body" and the position is open, "earthly, natural, demonic" wisdom, as opposed to that "wisdom from above," will prevail (James 3:15,17,18). As long as cheap grace is the illegitimate child of public profession, political-correctness will continue to wax while doctrine and discipline will continue to wane.

As long as evidence of "newness of life" is disdained, tares will multiply geometrically in the fields of the Lord of the harvest. As long as biblical ignorance continues to breed in our pews, churches will continue to see nothing wrong with forcing the called shepherds of God out of their pastures. As long as inmates are allowed to run the asylum, the cells will continue to be occupied by the elect while the non-elect will continue in chairs of authority and put their feet on the desk.

As Roy Fish noted (SBC Life, December, 1996): "When lost people are in a place of leadership, it has a serious effect in dragging us down and holding us back. A lost person can't be enthusiastic about God moving in revival. Nobody knows what percentage of people in our churches are lost; but I'm confident lost people can get into leadership positions very easily in our churches, and do great damage to the work."

Real leaders are not so quick to give in to hell's howling few, nor are they so easily driven from their God-called positions. After all, "the truth will set you free," not return you to the worldly servitude. As for me, I'd rather stand my ground and fight the good fight than be driven back down the narrow way by the Bulls of Bashan.

Editor's note: Brother Gillmartin makes a valid point, but raises another: Dare we conclude that brotherhood in Christ is a guarantee against division of opinion? What say you, readers?