The Savior of Science

by Stanley L. Jaki

The book has two major parts. In the first part the author outlines the sterile outcomes of science that were void of a true knowledge of God, especially a belief in Christ as the only begotten Son of God. Greece, China, India and the early Muslim empire were largely void of scientific advancement. It was only during the Middle Ages that scientists-who were also committed Christians-began to make rapid advances in the field of science.

The second part of the book discusses the deleterious effects of materialistic evolution begun by Charles Darwin and espoused by hundreds since. A cosmos by a Creator is incompatible with random selection espoused by followers of Darwin. The universe shows order and design that could have come only through a wise Creator.

But here lies a mystery. The author strongly rejects materialistic evolution, but he also strongly rejects the Genesis account of creation. He calls creation science a "strategic error." He contends that belief in the literal interpretation of the Genesis creation story robs us of its true meaning: God is supreme and over all. How the two ideas conflict escapes me.

One who reads this book will be convinced that it is a philosophical treatment of biblical teaching rather than a exegesis of what the Bible says about science. I am not persuaded that the author has a convincing argument that Christ is the Savior of science.