He Must Increase

by Jan Silvious

In this day of fallen heroes and Christian superstars, it is important that we get a firm grip on what our attitude should be toward those who bring Jesus to us in any form.

Many people are too easily impressed by Christian celebrities-musicians, authors, lecturers, television personalities, evangelists-and will quote their favorites almost more readily than they quote the Word of God. "John McArthur says..." or "Chuck Swindoll says..." or "Billy Graham says...." We honor these earthly vessels because they have ministered to us in profound ways. But none of them would want to be the only source of truth for us, nor would they want to replace Jesus in our lives.

Jan SilviousIn her devotional book, Each New Day, Corrie ten Boom tells a story that illustrates the importance of this principle: The Indian Christian, Sadhu Sundar Singh, was once asked if he was influenced by the honor his friends gave him. He said, "When Jesus entered Jerusalem, many people spread their clothing and palm branches on the street to honor the Lord.

"Jesus was riding, as the prophets fortold, on a donkey. In this way the feet of Jesus did not touch the street adorned with clothes and branches, but instead the donkey walked over them.

"It would have been very stupid of the donkey if she had imagined that she was very important. It was not for her that the people threw their clothes on the streets."

Stupid are those who spread the good news of Jesus and expect to receive glory themselves. The glory should go to Jesus.

The more people came to this godly man after his meetings, the more he withdrew from the crowd, to be in the silence where God spoke to him.

No sensation. No show.

He brought them the living Word, Jesus.

When you think of a man or woman who brings you Jesus in the same way you think of the donkey who carried the Lord that day so long ago, then it might be easier to keep things in perspective. The donkey was a useful tool, but it was Jesus who caused her to be included in the Bible.

From The 5-Minute Devotional © Zondervan, 1991