Readers' Forum

"Let Your Bible Be the Judge"

Concerning the "One Man's Opinion" letter to the editor about women authors of Pulpit Helps articles, I agree. Ms. Robinson's one verse defense of all women leaders (Gal. 3:28) reflects very well the present day lack of biblical knowledge concerning male headship and church leadership. Is the biblical standard of who preaches and teaches only "is their content biblical?" Maybe Ms. Robinson (and the rest of the editorial staff) should consider the following biblical instruction:

• 1 Corinthians 11:3: "But I want you to know that the head of every man is Christ, the head of the woman is man, and the head of Christ is God."

• 1 Timothy 3:1: "If a man desires the position of a bishop, he desires a good work."

• 1 Corinthians 11:34: "Let your women keep silent in the churches, for they are not permitted to speak; but they are to be submissive, as the law also says." (In context, this addresses women prophesying.)

• 1 Timothy 2:11,12: "Let a woman learn in silence with all submission. And I do not permit a woman to teach or to have authority over a man, but to be in silence."

The unity we have in Christ as males and females has nothing to do with biblical authority to teach and preach the Word of God. God Himself is unified, but Christ is willingly submissive to His head, God (1 Cor. 11:3). Jesus' submission to the will of His Father makes no inequality in their relationship.

Since your publication is for preachers, it is logical that the contributors would have the spiritual authority to teach and preach the articles printed. The occasional woman-to-woman or non-instructive article by a woman is reasonable. Let your Bible be the judge, and set your unbiblical haughtiness and "women's equal rights" ideas aside!

John Currier
 Allison Bible Church, Allison, IA

Another Opinion

Interesting how we interpret different articles and how others respond. In Lentz's June letter, there was no mention of biblical error. Was the article pleading for the men to take their responsible role, reacting to Pulpit Helps or what? Lentz seemed to be reacting to female input, yet Gailynn seemed to react to Lentz. Unfortunate that roles have changed, disappointing that Gal 3:28 is used to describe the roles in the body of Christ and not seen as the oneness of salvation! Perhaps Lentz could ask forgiveness from Gailynn and Gailynn could find other passages of Scripture to support the role changes within the body of Christ. The possibility could be that both are over-reacting and common ground would not be so shaky.

P.S. Have role changes really strengthened the body of Christ or just helped the church fit into the mold of society? If the roles continue to change, what's the future look like? What do the Scriptures support?

Pastor Jim Powers
Garden City, MO

Argues Context of Galatians 3:28

I wish to say at the onset that I am all for women performing their biblical role. However I am tired of women like Gailynn Robinson taking Galatians 3:28 out of context. This wonderful verse of Scripture has been butchered by more women trying to support a role they were never meant to fill.

Galatians 3:28 is in reference to one's position in salvation, there being no ethnic (Jew, Greek), social (bond, free) or sexual (male, female) distinctions. God views them all the same at the foot of the cross having "put on Christ" (v. 27). Maybe this is why Bob Lentz would not have the women folk write articles - because of the lack of exegesis.

Pastor Chris Bryden
Selma, NC

A Demand for Equal Time

The one-sided article, "What About Divorced Preachers?" badly needs a rebuttal. The popular teaching of the day is what was presented. Most pastors today teach that God permits divorce. Evangelicals and Fundamentalists are in too deep to back out now. Polls show that fundamentalists and evangelicals have the highest divorce rate! I believe I read that in Pulpit Helps. Could that statistic be a result of the teaching given? A young person, considering dating a girl, looks at the divorced people sitting around him in church. He is being taught that if it does not work out, he can divorce later on.

Richard Averitt
Lino Lakes, Minnesota

Editor's response: If you had truly read the article, you would have realized that author William Nicholson was very far from approving divorce for any reason. He insisted that the only genuine divorce is one in which the marriage is fractured by a sexual liaison outside the marriage by one of the partners…i.e., adultery. He then went on to state his belief that a pastor who had been the innocent spouse of an adulterer had every right to remain in his ministry - a belief which the editors of Pulpit Helps share. We certainly agree that the prevalence of divorce, even in the church, is a huge tragedy, and a symptom of how far both culture and church have fallen - and surely a poor example to our children. But let's not further victimize those who have already been victimized by divorces they did not choose.

Concerned About "Sonship"

I just wanted to respond to Wayne Barber's recent article in Pulpit Helps called "Mature Sons Do Church God's Way." Though Wayne touches on some basic fundamental principles for the believer, I have seen his focus on "sonship" often misused recently by leaders with the goal of seeing that all their staff agree with them, never make waves, and totally submit to their authority, no matter how tainted or misguided that authority is.

As a senior pastor I find that trend dangerous and see a "seduction by power" infiltrating many of our evangelical churches. Yes we are "sons" of God, but we also enjoy fellowship, relationship, creativity, and most of all the love of our Father.

I am thankful that Wayne points out that you can "have leaders in the church who are enamored with themselves," but at the same time a too-narrow focus on sonship without servanthood will actually encourage more leaders to become inward-focused rather than giving God the glory. I would have liked to have seen a more balanced and more practical article, to be honest.

Gary Sinclair
Pastor, Central Illinois