No, It Will Hurt

by Margie Overton

Recently, I read about a little girl who was injured in a fall. The results were a badly bruised knee. Her mother wanted to get treatment immediately. The little girl, fearful of the possible pain, pleaded, "No, it will hurt!" her mother relented and no treatment was given.

Four days later, the infected area was swollen and very painful. The mother called the doctor. He insisted upon putting the little girl in the hospital, but again she cried, "No, it will hurt!" And again, the mother gave in.

When serious infection was discovered five days later, the only possibility for saving the child's life was amputation. Her mother, who could not bear the thought of her daughter being handicapped, refused permission to operate, and within a matter of hours, the little girl died.

The little girl died because her mother was too compassionate. Little comfort was obtained by her mother's insistence that she loved the child too much to hurt her. Oh, how it hurts to see our children in pain! How well I remember trying to remove festered splinters from my children. I feel sure that everyone has had such experiences. After sterilizing the needle and starting toward the child, it was not uncommon to hear screams as though you were really going to kill the child. You could have easily reasoned, "Since it will hurt I will just let it go." But one must do what is best for the child. And parents, by reason of age and wisdom, are better qualified to know what is best to do.

Just so, we have to discipline our children, and train them in the right way. They must be taught right from wrong. If parents fail to do this, when the child has grown to adulthood not knowing, nor having been taught Bible principles, such a person is usually headed for serious trouble. How sad that parents get so busy trying to make money to supply all the physical needs of their children and forget the most important thing, their spiritual growth (Eph. 6:1-4).

We teach our children verbally and also by example. A man who does not pray is teaching his children not to pray. If parents neglect the public worship they are teaching their children to neglect it, as though is is not important. A parent who does not read the Bible is teaching his children not to read it. If we do not teach our children truth, others will teach them error. Isn't it better for a parent to teach his child the truth, than for others to teach him error?

Yes, it hurts to remove a splinter from a hand, foot or wherever. Yes, it will hurt to put an antiseptic on a skinned knee to keep down infection. Yes, it will hurt to have a doctor set a broken arm. But it will hurt more if we do not give proper attention immediately.

It will hurt even more if we do not take time to teach and train our children, bringing them up in the way God wants us to.

For sure some things do hurt, but will surely hurt more if neglected.

The World Evangelist